How did the IAEA, a diplomatic and political international organization, come to dominate scientific institutions with a long tradition in radiation protection?

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“Human Rights and Nuclear Wrongs” – guest lecture by Dr. Linda Marie Richards

On Thursday, July 28, 2022, our current visiting scholar, Dr. Linda Marie Richards (Oregon State University) will be giving a guest lecture titled: An Auto/Ethnography of Human Rights and Nuclear Wrongs The event takes place at 18:00 CEST and will be livestreamed via Zoom (registration). Linda Marie Richards in an instructor in history at Oregon […]

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From Occupation to Containerization, 1945–early 1970s – talk by Prof. John P. DiMoia

Next up in our STGS lecture series on Thursday, June 23, 2022 (18:00 CEST), is a talk by Prof. John P. DiMoia from Seoul National University in Korea, who is visiting us this month: From Occupation to Containerization, 1945–early 1970s To join us via Zoom, please register here. Abstract: With the outbreak of the Korean War, […]

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Prof. Rentetzi on science diplomacy and academic sanctions

Prof. Dr. Maria Rentetzi recently wrote a piece for the Diplomatic Courier, arguing for a more sophisticated science diplomacy for the 21st century. Also, on June 9, 2022, German newspaper DIE ZEIT published an interview with Prof. Rentetzi on the value of international relations in times of the war in Ukraine. First half of interview (PDF, in German) Full interview […]

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International History of Radiation Protection

As a unique technoscientific and diplomatic organization, the IAEA embodies the defining feature of post-WWII nuclear research: political collaboration on an international level became the precondition for any international scientific cooperation.

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The Historical Relations of the IAEA to Other Regulatory Agencies

In the late 1950s the UN started to develop an international regulatory system for managing ionizing radiation risks based heavily on the geopolitical division of the world.

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Standardization and Implementation

The conceptual analysis of standardization is key to understanding scientific work at the interface of laboratory and clinical or industrial practice.

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